Marina

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 16 total)
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  • in reply to: Peeing blood after excersise. #1424
    Marina
    Marina
    Participant

    omg dude, see a doctor about that. Maybe it can happen after excessive exercise, but if you are gradually building up your running capacity, its not normal!

    in reply to: Food Chart #704
    Marina
    Marina
    Participant

    yes, Amy93, salt, peas, boar, chestnut, and stir frying are all Water, for example.

    in reply to: Food Chart #702
    Marina
    Marina
    Participant

    P.S.- failing “fully comprehensive”, which is a bit of an unfeasible bar, kindly post what you’ve got.

    Much appreciated.

    in reply to: Why not lemon water? #578
    Marina
    Marina
    Participant

    @amina
    great you mentioned tha as, personally, I first heard of lemon water as being a great alkalinising agent.

    this reminds me to ask what would be a good alternative to that end, especially for those concerned with the acid ph balance allegedly created by high red meat diets.

    so, two questions, really:
    a) is there truth to mainstream concerns around high red meat intake, acid ph , and it’s alleged consequences( inflammation)?
    b) if so, what would be a good alternative to drinking warm lemon water first thing, to bring the body to a more alkaline balance?

    thanks.

    in reply to: Why not lemon water? #519
    Marina
    Marina
    Participant

    I have only two reservations about the use of lemon water:

    1. the fact that lemon juice does activate heavy metals such as mercury contained in seafood as well as in nuts. So if one’s diet is, or has been rich in those foods, a lot of heavy metals will be triggered to become active within the body;
    2. that second half of lemon you have even saved in the fridge, from yesterday’s morning dose, when you first cut the lemon open, it has been interacting with oxygen and all sorts of other stuff, including bacteria, that is found in the air. I question how effective a detox agent it still is.
    By contrast, vinegar seems to me to be a far more stable substance, precisely due to the process of it’s making: fermentation. Even if its bottle were to be left open for some hours, most of it’s chemical integration with the air has already run it’s course, and thence its greater stability = reliability.

    I am certain these are but the most superficial of layers for preference of one over the other.

    in reply to: Chronic Fatigue #465
    Marina
    Marina
    Participant

    good point, Z, thank you.

    however, and just to disambiguate:

    a lot of people still associate rest with stillness, with stopping, whereas I was referring to “a change in activity”, as “rest”.
    an example: someone who always practices hatha yoga, would “rest” by doing vinyasa, or going for a run, or a swim. just as someone who always goes shopping to relax, could try going for a massage, to the theatre, or to some live music. point being, change in activity also has a restful effect.

    in reply to: Chronic Fatigue #457
    Marina
    Marina
    Participant

    Thank you, both.

    It is evident that the REST activity is of the essence.

    Be it in the form of actually giving one’s self permission to sleep, or relax from overdoing; be it the idea of rest a change of activity.

    Obviously fatigue, if observantly looked upon, will point to exactly what it is the individual is fatigued by / from. But this may be made very hard to admit if, for instance, it is a family situation, or another “trapping” situation that is not so easy to step out and away from. Thence the complexity in offering one-sized solutions, implied.

    Nevertheless, change of activity is what is required. And within this apparently broad directive, there is plenty of scope to personalize the idea of rest, – which is what is necessary, or at the least is a good place to start

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 8 months ago by Marina Marina.
    in reply to: Chronic Fatigue #449
    Marina
    Marina
    Participant

    Apologies. By discuss, I simply meant what preliminary changes have been effective in your experience.

    Exercise is usually suggested as being of great help in dealing with lethargy.

    Yet being continually fatigued, regardless, is something on another level altogether. Exercise does not necessarily increase vitaly. So I am interested in hearing what other suggestions you may have in addition to protein diet and exercise which stimulates both the circulation and organ functions.

    Thanks.

    in reply to: Importance of Spleen in Eastern Medicine (and health and beauty) #360
    Marina
    Marina
    Participant

    TY, @Z. I aim to stay within what is aligned and relevant to posts’ content.
    So in line with the article statement

    we live in the age of information and always moving

    i was strictly referring to the impact of lifestyle on organic function, and perhaps advancing yet another exit, – say for students, or those whose lifestyle involves exposure to a lot of information, – that is sharing, or circulating it somehow, as well as the all essential, physical exercise routine.

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 10 months ago by Marina Marina.
    in reply to: Importance of Spleen in Eastern Medicine (and health and beauty) #350
    Marina
    Marina
    Participant

    Skipping… How awesomely simple…!

    Sounds like this is much about circulation: of blood, thus of energy, consequently, no? And if so, then information too *must* circulate,- much like currency,- to maintain its own healthy level / flow, or am I just way off the mark?

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 10 months ago by Marina Marina. Reason: remove joke
    in reply to: Bruns – 1st, 2nd and 3rd degree #349
    Marina
    Marina
    Participant

    Thank you kindly, Z.

    Marina
    Marina
    Participant


    ” not to have too much raw leafy greens, as this dries up the digestive tract”

    wow…! this is such enlightening info!…
    out of interest, is having dry skin along the upper crease of the nostril, say around Yingxiang point, somehow revealing, or related to digestive tract dryness? [perhaps important to add: the person has a long history of feeding on raw leaves, and even a period of having been raw vegan.]

    in reply to: Chigong, Taichi, yoga – which one? #275
    Marina
    Marina
    Participant

    … without wanting to be pedantic, it perhaps matters to clarify:
    HamsaYogi teaches Kryia yoga, not what is known as Kundalini yoga, fyi.

    all of these practices, including qigong, and taichi, target kundalini energy. So it can lead to confusion. Their method, however, differs; thence their denomination as being Kryia Yoga, or Kundalini, or iyengar, etc.

    in reply to: Chigong, Taichi, yoga – which one? #273
    Marina
    Marina
    Participant

    Apologies, Henry, I don’t seem to have received notification of your post, thence The Silence…

    On the other hand, Amy93, just got yours, thence my being here now.

    To both, and FYI, it helps me to to be of some assistance if you are specific about the area in UK, or in London, as many of the classes will not make it to Google. They tend to be advertised locally, through flyers, and such.

    Often, classes run within local community halls, or church halls. So it’s worth checking that, as well as, depending on the particular area/community, in local, independent, trendyish cafés, independent health food stores/shops, and holistic/alternative therapy centers, even when they don’t mention Yoga of any kind, as part of their activities.

    KY teachers, in the UK, have tended to keep a relatively low profile, by comparison with, say, the USA. But there are quite a number of active, good ones, around.

    If you happen to be near Bethnal Green/ Shoreditch area, there are a couple of Yoga centers who have hosted classes with prominent, visiting KY teachers from the USA, such as Gurutaj, Gurumukh, – many, a favorite. These classes tend to take place in sites simply known for general, or some other denomination, yoga practice. So don’t limit your search to specifically looking for KY classes, especially when searching online.

    The following link leads to International, umbrella .orgs, specifically dedicated to KY http://www.ikyta.org/global-associations

    The one bellow, is specific to London – UK, and may be a great place to start for all UK based forum members:

    Kundalini Yoga Teachers Association
    Phone:44-(0)7952-697-550
    Email:info@kundaliniyoga.org.uk

    http://www.kundaliniyoga.org.uk

    Hope this begins to help.

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 11 months ago by Marina Marina.
    in reply to: Chigong, Taichi, yoga – which one? #239
    Marina
    Marina
    Participant

    Where are you based, Hery?

    There are many great classes/teachers in the london area, at least.
    There is also teacher training available in the UK, if that’s
    where you mean by “around”.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 16 total)